How to use your garden to increase the value of your property 

A recent visit to the Chelsea Flower Show has caused me to ponder upon the question of how a garden can play a part in enhancing the value of a property.  

 How to use your garden to increase the value of your property 


A recent visit to the Chelsea Flower Show has caused me to ponder upon the question of how a garden can play a part in enhancing the value of a property.  

A recent visit to the Chelsea Flower Show has given me cause to ponder upon the question of how a garden can play a part in enhancing the value of a property.  

As someone who has only recently acquired a garden I found the event inspiring and fascinating, leaving with plenty of ideas with what to do with my own space to add value to my home.  

A 2013 survey conducted by the Home Retail Group indicated that Britain invests £80billion in its own backyards, with the average garden having had £1790 worth of investment. The study quoted ‘two fifths of Britons refusing to choose or consider a home unless it has a sufficient garden. In fact, one in seven homeowners claim their garden has added more value to their home than they had ever invested’. 

So how can you increase the appeal and value of your garden?
The first things that are likely to come to mind – plants and flowers, lighting, furniture, etc, are perhaps rather intuitive, but also rather important.  A well-maintained and lit garden will be worth a lot more in terms of adding potential value to a property.

But if you are planning on selling in the future, remember that something too swanky might not be to the taste of the buyer. 

Read more: Online vs. Traditional Estate Agents: Which should I use to sell my house? 

Well cut grass, a patio area with some lanterns and nice garden furniture all tick the boxes. A nice, well-kept garden can add 20% to the value of your home. The easier it looks to maintain also contributes to the desirability. 

You wouldn’t want potential buyers to think they will have to slave away to maintain the good looks of their outdoor space. If you are moving or looking at adding a property to your portfolio then preferably you’d look for a South facing garden; vice versa if you plan on selling your property, spring/summer months work best as the buyers can picture themselves sitting in the garden enjoying the sunshine all the way from completion through to the Autumn.

Privacy is important and the more the feeling of seclusion, the better for the sale. In most areas (aside from highways) you can bring your fence up to 2 metres without requiring any additional permits. Whilst you are at it, why not add a fresh lick of paint to the fence making it look newer, better kept and updated? 

A decked area will create the illusion that there is more space in between the indoors and the garden (grass) area. Buyers are likely to pay more for more space and therefore making the most of the space, or maximising the feel of it, could pay off.  Another useful tip, which is as much for the outdoor space as for the inside, is to keep the spaces well defined. 

You might want to have a BBQ area on one-end and seating / eating area on another – any greenhouse on a different end. Setting defined spaces can help buyers picture themselves doing the specific things that section of the garden brings to mind. 

Last but not least, a conservatory can create additional space. Interestingly last year a study conducted by peer to peer platform Zopa and published last November found that conservatories provided the best return on the investment spent to upgrade your home. Next was the garden, the exterior, an extension and finally a roof replacement. 

Conservatories provide that additional space, without the need for planning permission (as long as it adheres to certain sizes). Unlike an actual extension, they are usually also exempt from many building regulations, and can be constructed at an average of £5,000. 

Have you recently made some changes to your garden? Tell us about them, or if you have any other queries, You can write to me at jemma.redpath@whatinvestment.co.uk

Comments (0)